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D-Lab working groups bring together researchers from across disciplines and departments who share a common interest under the broad rubric of data-intensive social science. These self-organizing groups meet regularly to discuss relevant research, master a new technological skill, or collaborate on a project.

Curious what we've offered in the past? Check out our past working groups.

We're looking to add working groups on topics not yet covered here. Send us a proposal.

Berkeley Digital Humanities Working Group

When & Where
Schedule: 
Every other Wed, 3:00pm to 4:30pm (Spring 2020 dates: April 8, April 22, May 6, 2020)
Location: 
Location for April 2020 to be announced after Spring Break. The group will likely move to an online format.
Description

The Berkeley Digital Humanities Working Group began in 2011 as a place to facilitate interdisciplinary conversations around topics in the Digital Humanities (broadly defined).  We welcome participants from all disciplinary backgrounds, beginners and experts in digital skills, students, faculty, and staff.  The agenda for our biweekly meetings is participant driven, and we typically hold a variety of meetings, including project presentations, hackerspace-style open project days, and mashup meetings with other working groups.  Our major project for the year is planning the DH Faire, an event in the spring consisting of a faculty panel, a reception with poster presentations, and other events hosted by our partner groups.  The DH Working Group is sponsored by the Townsend Center for the Humanities and hosted in D-Lab.  It is a fantastic place for interdisciplinary conversation and networking across campus units, and we welcome you to join!

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings.

Details
Participant Technology Requirement: 
none

Berkeley Undergraduate Digital Humanities Association (BUDHA)

When & Where
Schedule: 
Every other Thursday, 6pm-7pm
Location: 
Barrows 371: D-Lab Large Breakout Room
Description

The Berkeley Undergraduate Digital Humanities Association (BUDHA) is a diverse community of students, faculty, and staff on the UC Berkeley campus that connects undergraduates with the emerging interdisciplinary field of Digital Humanities (DH). We encourage undergraduates to become involved in DH research through a variety of on-campus organizations and public resources, and foster a learning community through collaborative projects that leverage members' unique interests and skills.

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings.

Black Recruitment and Retention Center

When & Where
Schedule: 
Monthly on the first Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Description

The Black Recruitment and Retention Center is a student initiated, AND entirely a student ran organization that was founded in 1983 as direct response to the removal of Black students from affirmative action policies and programs, including admissions consideration, early academic outreach programs, and retention services. 

 

We hold various recruitment and retention programs throughout the semester in order to:

1) Actively recruit Black students and students of color from high schools and community colleges

2) Be aware of and involved in the political realm of education for our community

3) Maintain a strong connection with our communities outside of Cal, while retaining ourselves academically and socially. 

 

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings.

Computational Text Analysis Working Group (CTAWG)

When & Where
Schedule: 
Every other Wednesday, 3:00-5:00pm
Location: 
Barrows 356B: D-Lab Convening Room
Description

The Computational Text Analysis Working Group (CTAWG) features demos, tutorials, and ongoing projects through which we are learning to use an array of computational text analysis approaches including: topic modeling, TF-IDF, dictionary methods, supervised machine learning, cosine similarity scores, words-to-vectors, grammar parsing, regular expressions, and more. Visit the CTAWG website to learn more.

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings. Please register so we can provide enough seating, materials, etc.

 

Details
Participant Technology Requirement: 
Laptop

Critical University Studies Working Group (CUSWG)

When & Where
Schedule: 
Every other Tuesday, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: 
Berkeley Way West
Description

The Critical University Studies (CUS) working group convenes and cultivates a critical scholarly community that contends with issues of power, race, and gender in higher education. Our goals are to: 1) deepen our theoretical inquiry related to critical studies of higher education through existing scholarship and in particular, develop theoretical and empirical links with scholarship from critical studies of race, gender, and class. We draw inspiration from the black radical tradition and black feminism in particular, indigenous studies, and decolonial theory. Through this goal, we hope to further theoretical frameworks relevant to race and gender and to university studies.

Next, we seek to 2) strengthen our methodological approaches on how to conduct ethical and rigorous research in university settings and with communities that shape and are influenced by institutions of higher education. To this extent, we engage in reflection of our own positionalities and on how our research might mitigate or reinforce existing power structures. As such, we seek to explore non-traditional modes of knowledge production and participatory approaches to data collection. We aspire to 3) cultivate community that supports graduate students through milestones and beyond degree completion, but also to further this community beyond Berkeley such as by engaging with faculty and other students at conferences and through an event featuring a guest speaker.

Contemporary issues of concern to our group’s research include but are not limited to the following:

  • Neoliberalism and academic free speech
  • Politics of redemption, carcerality, and the pipeline from prisons to postsecondary education
  • Political economy of surveillance, discipline, and exploitation in collegiate sports
  • Youth and student movements, democratization of higher education
  • Decolonization and “globalization” of higher education
  • The reproduction of antiblackness in the inclusion of black students, staff, and faculty 

The CUS working group is proposed amidst a recent rise of Critical University Studies. Newfield (2016) and others have brought necessary attention, for example, to the consequences of privatizing and limiting access to universities and to a broader “crisis” of higher education. While several scholars have dedicated attention to race in universities (see Williamson-Lott 2018, Mustaffa 2017), rarely have scholars have dedicated explicit attention to both race and gender within university studies, with a few notable exceptions that have begun to map the emergent CUS field (Boggs & Mitchell 2018). Several group members have been working on intersectional approaches, but the opportunity to do so within critical university studies is novel. Our renovation of critical university studies therefore intervenes in this gap, placing race, gender as well as class and generation at the center of analyses.

CUS is positioned to build from, but also expand the work of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Education (GSE) and the Center for Studies of Higher Education (CSHE) which focus on k-12 Critical University Studies | Center for Race & Gender 3 education and policy, respectively. By focusing on power, violence, and the experiences, needs, and agency of historically marginalized groups, we also hope to demonstrate a pathway for departments and centers to deepen their respective engagement with critical university studies. A CRG grant would enable us to develop work that could be of interest to Critical Theory, Ethnic Studies, African American Studies, or Gender & Women’s Studies, for example. The scholarship from which we draw is primarily from the U.S. but also looks to work in global contexts such as Brazil and South Africa.

CUS met regularly through Spring 2019 (without funding) and developed priorities to formalize and advance our research. Proposed activities for 2019-2020 include:

  • Regular meetings. During our regular meetings, we will alternate with discussions of (1) extant research that informs our respective interests and (2) workshopping of one another’s academic work in progress. By doing so, we will not only support one another in expanding and deepening our comprehension of relevant research for our studies of higher education but also offer feedback appropriate to our theoretical scholarly traditions.
  • Speaker series. Few faculty at UC Berkeley are empirically and theoretically focused on the study of higher education. We aim to host 2-3 speakers each semester (depending on grant amount and distance/ availability). In the next year, we will primarily focus on recruiting seasoned and recent faculty within the state of California as guest speakers and will disseminate across campus. We have already begun reaching out to students and faculty at several neighboring institutions in the UC system (Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, San Diego), and will share events and promote collaboration with them.
  • Professional development via resource sharing. In the short-term, this group will circulate announcements about grants, fellowships, recent publications, and other relevant developments for critical studies of higher education. In the long-term, we hope to compile a more formal database and/or resource guide to aid a broader audience toward critical university studies. This might exist as a bibliography or literature review publication for those interested in learning more about this blooming scholarly community.
  • Developing conference proposals. We will share information about upcoming conference opportunities and submit proposals together. Beginning with a submission to the American Educational Research Association (AERA). We also look forward to offering the space to incoming students in multiple departments. 

After this initial period, we hope to renew and/or apply for a Project Grant.

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings.

GeoMatters Working Group

When & Where
Schedule: 
On hiatus Fall 2019
Location: 
Barrows 371: Large Breakout Room
Description

Staff and students in the D-Lab, GIF and Library have launched a new working group focused on geospatial data, mapping and analysis.  We will use this time for a mix of activities including talks, trainings, and group consulting. The group is open to people of all skill levels with the goal of learning from each other through mentorship and co-working.  We welcome your questions about finding geospatial data, working with the data in desktop GIS like ArcGIS or QGIS, online tools like ArcGIS Online and CARTO, or programming tools like R and Python.

We will be holding our first meeting of the Spring 2019 semester on the afternoon of Monday, February 11, 12:00 - 1:30 in Barrows 371. This will be a planning meeting, where we'll brainstorm format and topics for the rest of the semester, and also scheduling (i.e. the meetings are now scheduled for roughly every other Monday from 12:00 - 1:30PM). We're trying to get this in front of any and all potentially interested students, to draw a good initial crowd. So please consider coming, and please share freely!  If you miss the February 11 meeting, please send an email to the coordinators or check the D-Lab website for info on subsequent meetings.

On hiatus Fall 2019

Details
D-lab Facilitator: 
Patty Frontiera

Power and Learning in Social Media Working Group

When & Where
Schedule: 
Wednesdays, 2pm - 3pm
Location: 
Barrows 64: D-Lab Instructional Lab
Description

The power and learning in social media working group is an interdisciplinary group that exists to support researchers, practitioners, artists and anyone else interested in digital technologies, sociocultural dimensions of learning, and critical race perspectives on social media activity. We gather to critically explore the potentials of social media and other participatory technologies as sites of learning. We are currently engaged in a broad research collaboration around the creation of publics and counterpublics through social media. Some of the questions that we seek to explore throughout the semester include; What kind of relationship do non-dominant communities have with digital technologies in their everyday lives? What are the affordances of digital technologies and social media for mobilizing discourses, knowledge, and constellations of affect across digital modalities? How do we make sense of EdTech “innovations,” policies, and outcomes in a digitized and neoliberal era?  

Our bi-weekly meetings consist of hands-on exploration of social media methods and tools, learning from experienced social media and digital technology researchers, and preparing our own research for publication. As we grow, we will continue to plan additional projects, symposia, and more. We welcome new members to add to the conversation!

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings

PRIVATE: Creating Freedom Movements

When & Where
Schedule: 
Mondays, 6:30-9:30PM from September 24, 2018 - August 19, 2019
Location: 
D-Lab Convening Room (356B Barrows)
Description

Creating Freedom Movements is a year-long program for grassroots change-makers that trains visionary skilled leaders, incubates social & environmental justice projects, builds beloved community & cross-issue solidarity, and fosters joy. Participants engage in 9 months of weekly workshops in social movement history & analysis, the arts, healing practices and practical skills, followed by 3 months of mentorship as they cultivate projects that increase justice & joy in their communities. Our program supports the sustainability & power of grassroots work, cultivates cultures of connection & reciprocity, and increases the collective power of justice movements.

PRIVATE: Data Science Discovery Seminar

When & Where
Schedule: 
Thursdays 5pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Barrows 356: D-Lab Convening Room
Description

For students in Data 100 or equivalent skill level, this seminar supports students who are matched with cutting edge research projects from the Data Science Discovery Program. 

PRIVATE: Data Science Foundations Seminar

When & Where
Schedule: 
Mondays 6pm to 7pm
Location: 
Barrows 64: D-Lab Instructional Lab
Description

For students currently in Data 8: a specialized Data 8 lab section will be offered. In addition, students will also enroll in a Foundations Seminar (1 unit) with guest speakers who will provide advice for succeeding in data science. Students will have access to special office hours for advising and help.

 

PRIVATE: Data Science Pathways Seminar

When & Where
Schedule: 
Tuesdays 5pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Barrows 356: D-Lab Convening Room
Description

For students who have already completed Data 8, this seminar supports long-term discovery experiences and career orientation. It will feature guest speakers from industry and special workshops on cutting-edge data science tools. This seminar will meet once a week for 90 minutes.

 

 

Securing Research Data

When & Where
Schedule: 
4th Monday of the month, 2:00 - 3:00pm
Location: 
D-Lab (Barrows 371)
Description

The goal of this working group is to understand issues around sensitive/restricted use research data from a variety of views - especially from the perspective of Berkeley researchers who need and use such data and the staff and units who support that. We will also seek to develop concrete solutions and products - whether it is environments, model security plans or data use agreements, or compendia of local data or resources. A third goal of this group is to provide input to IT and other organizations working on developing a set of suggested solutions to provide to campus leadership. We expect to cover:

  • potential sources for these research data 
  • the legal environment and constraints under which data can be shared 
  • models for hosting RUD 
  • language used in data protection plans for various providers 
  • places on campus which can house restricted use data 
  • OPHS/IRB concerns and resources 
  • ... and topics you might want to see covered.

 For the Spring of 2020, we will meet the 4th Monday of every month beginning January 27, 2020.

Details
D-lab Facilitator: 
Patty Frontiera
Aaron Culich

Somali, Ethiopian, Eritrean, South Sudanese, Sudanese Student Association (SEE§A)

When & Where
Schedule: 
Every other Tuesday, 7pm - 9pm
Location: 
Barrows 356B: D-Lab Convening Room
Description

The Somali, Ethiopian, Eritrean, South Sudanese, Sudanese Student Association (SEE§A) (formerly as Horn of Africa Student Association) is a student-based organization that focuses on the further academic, professional, social, and cultural advancement of Somali, Ethiopian, Eritrean, South Sudan and Sudanese identifying students on the University of California, Berkeley campus. This organization initiates programs and activities within and outside of the university to promote interaction and strengthen relations between students and members of the greater community. SEE§A serves as a safe space to exchange current affairs and discuss new developments, and most importantly, a place to share, express and unify our cultures and traditions.

D-Lab's space allows us to complete these tasks as one community and enables us to create a safe space to express our ideas and grow as an organization. We plan to work with immigrants and refugees of these ethnic groups as well as address various health issues within our community this semester.

Please feel free to contact us via email: seessaucberkeley@gmail.com, Facebook: SEE§A UC Berkeley and/or Instagram: @seessaucberkeley about any inquiries you may have or if you would like to join the community!

Check the D-Lab Calendar to view and register for upcoming working group meetings